Information Strategy and Political Warfare - Curriculum 698

Academic Associate

Hy Rothstein, Ph.D.

Code DA/Ro, Root Hall, Room 212

(831) 656-2203, DSN 756-2203

FAX (831) 656-2649

hsrothst@nps.edu

Program Manager

Jennifer J. Duncan

Code DA, Root Hall, Room 219

(831) 656-3584, DSN 756-3584

FAX (831) 656-2649

jduncan@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The objective of this curriculum is to educate military personnel and civilian officials of the United States and its Allies to better defend the nation and prevent, prepare for, and prevail in conflicts by operating effectively in the information environment.

The curriculum is designed for both the specialist who will be assigned to an information related position and the generalist who will be assigned to an operations directorate. The curriculum includes a core of military art and operations, emerging security challenges, intelligence and network analyses, the psychological and social dimensions of warfare emphasizing information strategy, political warfare, military deception, defense support to public diplomacy analytical methods, and regional studies.

In addition to the core curriculum, the program includes customizable elective sequences for each student. These sequences draw on courses throughout the Naval Postgraduate School. Each custom sequence must be approved by the academic associate for the 698 curriculum.

This flexibility allows for individual sequences which may include concentrations in cyber systems and operations, electronic warfare, intelligence support to war in the information environment, regional studies or computer network operations. Additional areas of concentration are available to meet specific student and organizational requirements. Finally, each student will write a thesis or complete a capstone project relevant to operating in the information environment. The Information Strategy and Political Warfare curriculum is designed to develop the following competencies in its graduates:

  • Graduates will understand the organization, formulation, and execution of national security strategy and national military strategy, the effects of technical developments on warfare, the capabilities and roles of military forces throughout the entire spectrum of conflict, and current defense issues.
  • Graduates will explore major security issues among states and between states and non-state actors with emphasis placed on examining the sources of instability and violence including ethnic conflict, insurgency and terrorism.
  • Graduates will understand the role of information in winning wars and achieving favorable political outcomes. To operate effectively in the information environment, graduates need to competently integrate information-related capabilities in concert with other lines of operations to:
    • Engage and inform allied and friendly audiences about national and military objectives: Who we are, what we are doing, and why it matters.
    • Engage, inform, persuade and influence neutral audiences: convert them to allies, or dissuade them from aiding/joining adversaries.
    • Influence adversaries: Discourage, demoralize, confuse, deceive and corrupt, disrupt or usurp their ability to communicate and make decisions that will hurt us.
    • We also need to protect our own communications, information systems and decision-making from adversary attempts to influence, corrupt, disrupt or usurp them via manipulation of the information environment.
  • Graduates will have a foundation in analytical methods and their application to military modeling, simulations and gaming. Close attention will be given to the ways in which such analytical techniques can be used in heuristic and decision making tools for strategic and operational planning. Attention will be given to both historical and contemporary military applications with particular focus on the ways in which such techniques can be used to address issues of interest to the joint information operations community.
  • Graduates will have a systems level understanding of information systems and their vulnerabilities as well as capabilities.
  • Graduates will know intelligence, targeting and assessment processes and their applications to joint warfare through the national level with particular emphasis given to the role of intelligence in planning, executing and terminating information operations.
  • Graduates will demonstrate their ability to conduct independent research and analysis, and proficiency in presenting the results in writing by means of a thesis or capstone project appropriate to this curriculum.

Requirements for Entry

The Information Strategy and Political Warfare curriculum is open to all branches of the military, federal employees, international military officers and government sponsored civilians. U.S. officers must be eligible for a TOP SECRET clearance with access to Sensitive Compartmented Information based on a Special Background Investigation completed within the last five years. A baccalaureate degree earned with above average academic performance and a minimum APC of 265 is required.

Entry Date

The Information Strategy and Political Warfare curriculum is a six-quarter course of study with entry dates in January and July. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or the Program Officer for this curriculum.

Degree

The Master of Science in Information Strategy and Political Warfare degree will be awarded in accordance with the following degree requirements:

  1. This degree requires 45 quarter-hours of graduate-level work, of which 15 hours must represent courses at the 4000 level.
  2. Completion of an acceptable thesis or capstone project.

The Chairman of the Defense Analysis Department and the Academic Associate of the Information Strategy and Political Warfare curriculum approve each individual program.

Subspecialty

Completion of the 698 curriculum qualifies officers in multiple information related specialties. The curriculum sponsor is the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Policy (OSD-P).

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

Command Positions at the LTC/CDR level and above

Staff Officer, Plans or Operations: Joint Headquarters

Information Operations Officer at the LTC/CDR level and above on service staffs, JTFS, and combatant commands

Typical Course of Study

Quarter 1

Course NumberTitleCreditsLecture HoursLab Hours
DA3882Deterrence, Coercion, & Crisis Management

4

0

DA2010Technical Writing and Composition

4

0

MN3121Organizational Design for Special Operations

4

0

DA2410Modeling for Military Decision Making, I

4

0

Quarter 2

Course NumberTitleCreditsLecture HoursLab Hours
DA3101Conflict in the Information Age

4

0

DA3250

DA4450

DA3410Modeling for Special Operations II

4

0

Quarter 3

Course NumberTitleCreditsLecture HoursLab Hours
DA4107Public Diplomacy to Psychological Operations

4

0

DA4106Trust, Influence and Networks

4

0

DA3104Computer Network Attack and Defense

4

1

DA3802Seminar in Guerrilla Warfare

4

0

Quarter 4

Course NumberTitleCreditsLecture HoursLab Hours
DA3180Warfare in the Electromagnetic Spectrum: Principles and Applications

4

0

DA4108Deception, Denial, Surprise, and Counterdeception

4

0

DA3750Anthropology of Conflict

4

0

DA3120Jihadi Information Operations

4

0

Quarter 5

Course NumberTitleCreditsLecture HoursLab Hours
DA3801International Terrorism

4

0

DA3720The Rise of Religious Violence

4

0

DAXXXXEmphasis Elective

DA4600Dark Networks

4

0

Quarter 6

Course NumberTitleCreditsLecture HoursLab Hours
DA4105Special Topics in Information Operations

4

0

DA4104Militaries and Technological Change

4

0

DA3105Conflict and Cyberspace

4

1

DA4710Critical Thinking and Ethical Decision Making

4

0

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)

Information Strategy and Political Warfare - Curriculum 698

Subspecialty Code: None

  1. Military Art and Operations: Graduates will understand the organization, formulation, and execution of national security strategy and national military strategy; the effects of technical developments on warfare; the capabilities and roles of military forces throughout the entire spectrum of conflict; and current defense issues.
  2. Emerging Security Challenges: Graduates will explore major security issues among states and between states and nonstate actors, with emphasis placed on examining the sources of instability and violence including ethnic conflict, insurgency, and terrorism.
  3. Information Operations (IO): Graduates will understand the role of information in winning wars. An important aspect of this requirement is to examine the principles of information operations, to include psychological operations, military deception, computer network operations, electronic warfare, public affairs and command and control warfare, and how the proper integration of IO can contribute to U.S. information dominance of the twenty-first century battlefield. Additionally, graduates will understand the role of physical (kinetic) attack and civil-military operations (CMO) in support of DoD informational objectives.
  4. Analytical Methods and Applications: Graduates will have a foundation in analytical methods and their application to military modeling, simulations, and gaming. Close attention will be given to the ways in which such analytical techniques can be used in heuristic and decision-making tools for strategic and operational planning. Attention will be given to both historical and contemporary military applications with particular focus on the ways in which such techniques can be used to address issues of interest to the joint information operations community.
  5. Information Systems: Graduates will have a systems-level understanding of information systems and their vulnerabilities as well as capabilities.
  6. Intelligence Processes and Applications: Graduates will know intelligence, targeting, and assessment processes, and their applications to joint warfare through the national level, with particular emphasis given to the role of intelligence in planning, executing, and terminating information operations.
  7. Thesis: Graduates will demonstrate their ability to conduct independent research and analysis, and demonstrate proficiency in presenting the results in writing by means of a thesis appropriate to this curriculum.