Department of Computer Sciences

Chairman

Gurminder Singh, Ph.D.

Code CS, Glasgow East, Room 317

(831) 656-3041, DSN 756-3041

gsingh@nps.edu

Associate Chairman

Geoff Xie, Ph.D.

Code CS/Gx, Glasgow East, Room 125

(831) 656-2693, DSN 756-2693

xie@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Academic Affairs

Alan Shaffer, Ph.D.

Code CS/As, Glasgow East, Room 218

(831) 656-3319, DSN 756-3199

alan.shaffer@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Research

Mathias Kölsch, Ph.D.

Code CS/Mk, Watkins Hall, Room 279

(831) 656-3402, DSN 756-3402

kolsch@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Administration

Loren E. Peitso

Code CS/Lp, Glasgow East, Room 335

(831) 656-3009, DSN 756-3009

lepeitso@nps.edu

Academic Associate of Computer Science Curriculum

Alan Shaffer, Ph.D.

Code CS/As, Glasgow East, Room 218

(831) 656-3319, DSN 756-3319

alan.shaffer@nps.edu

Academic Associate of MOVES Curriculum

Chris Darken, Ph.D. 

Code CS/Cd, Watkins Hall, Room 382

(831) 656-2095, DSN 756-2095

cjdarken@nps.edu

Academic Associate of Software Engineering Curriculum

Alan Shaffer, Ph.D.

Code CS/As, Glasgow East, Room 218

(831) 656-3319, DSN 756-3319

alan.shaffer@nps.edu

Academic Associate of Computing Technology Curriculum

Alan Shaffer, Ph.D.

Code CS/As, Glasgow East, Room 218

(831) 656-3319, DSN 756-3319

alan.shaffer@nps.edu

Academic Associate of Identity Management and Cyber Security Curriculum

Alan Shaffer, Ph.D. 

Code CS/As, Glasgow East, Room 218

(831) 656-3319, DSN 756-3319

alan.shaffer@nps.edu

 

* The year of joining the Naval Postgraduate School faculty is indicated in parentheses.

Bruce Allen, Research Associate (2008); B.S., California State University at Sacramento, 1989.

Peter Ateshian, Research Associate (2004); M. Eng., University of California Berkeley, 1979.

Eric Bachmann, Research Assistant Professor, (1997); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 2000.

Imre Balogh, Research Associate Professor, Director, MOVES Institute (2009); Ph.D.,New Mexico State University, 1993.

Valdis Berzins, Professor (1986); Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1979.

Robert Beverly, Associate Professor (2009); Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2008.

Curtis Blais, Research Associate (1999); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 2018.

Arnie Buss, Research Associate Professor (1994); Ph.D., Cornell University, 1987.

Paul Chatelier, Research Associate Professor (2009); M.A., University of New Mexico, 1975.

Paul Clark, Research Associate (1999); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1999.

Mark Cole (MAJ),Military Lecturer (2019); M.S., Wright State University, 2009.

Richard S. Cote, Senior Lecturer (2001); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2000.

Chris Darken, Associate Professor (2001); Ph.D., Yale University, 1993.

Rudy Darken, Professor (1996); D.Sc., George Washington University, 1995.

Arijit Das, Research Associate (2003); M.S., University of Nevada, 1989.

Cecelia Davis, Faculty Associate (2002); M.A., Trident University International, 2016.

Duane Davis, Research Associate Professor (2008); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 2006.

Peter J. Denning, Director of the Cebrowski Institute, Director of the Consortium for Intelligent Systems Education and Research, and Distinguished Professor (2002); Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1968.

George Dinolt, Professor of the Practice of Cyber Operations (2002); Ph.D., University of Wisconsin at Madison, 1971.

Doron Drusinsky, Associate Professor (2002); Ph.D., Weizmann Institute of Science, 1988.

Chris Eagle, Senior Lecturer (1997); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1995.

Christian Fitzpatrick, Research Associate (2018); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2009.

John D. (JD) Fulp, Senior Lecturer (2001); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1996.

Clay Greunke, Research Associate (2018); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2015.

Michael Guerrero, Research Associate (2006); M.S., Southern Methodist University, 2009.

Britta Hale, Assistant Professor (2018); Ph.D., University of London, Royal Holloway (NTNU), 2017.

Eric Heine, Research Associate (2008); B.S., UC Santa Cruz, 2004.

Glenn Hodges (LTC), Military Assistant Professor and Deputy Director MOVES Institute (2017); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 2014.

Ted Huffmire, Associate Professor (2007); Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara, 2007.

Cynthia Irvine, Professor and Director, Center for Information Systems Security Studies and Research (1994); Ph.D., Case Western University, 1975.

Erik Johnson, Research Associate (2002); B.S., Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, 1995.

Mathias Kölsch, Associate Professor (2005); Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara, 2004.

Michael Krause, Research Associate (2020); Ph.D., University of Duesseldorf, 1999.

Joshua A. Kroll, Assistant Professor (2019); Ph.D., Princeton University, 2015.

Rebecca Law, Research Associate (2011); M.S., Old Dominion University, 2018.

Ryan Lee, Research Associate (2011); M.S., Southern Methodist University, 2010.

Jimmy Liberato, Research Associate (1995); B.S., UC Santa Cruz, 1977.

Luqi, Professor (1986); Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1986.

Michael McCarrin, Research Associate (2014); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2014.

Perry McDowell, Research Associate (2000); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1995.

Bret Michael, Professor (1998); Ph.D., George Mason University, 1993.

Vinnie Monaco, Assistant Professor (2018); Ph.D., Pace University, 2015.

Thuy Nguyen, Research Associate (2002); B.A., University of California at San Diego, 1982.

Terry Norbaten, Research Associate (2005); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2004.

Marko Orescanin, Assistant Professor (2019); Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2010.

Loren Peitso, Senior Lecturer (2004); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2002.

Charles Prince, Research Associate (2006); B.S., Oregon State University, 1993.

Brittany Ramsay, Research Associate (2010); B.A., University of Colorado, 2007.

Eric Regnier (LCDR), Program Officer (2018); MPHIL., Cambridge University, 2009.

David Reeves, Research Associate (2012); B.S., New Mexico State University, 2004.

Ed Rockower, Research Professor (1984, 2009); Ph.D., Brandeis University, 1999.

Justin Rohrer, Assistant Professor (2011); Ph.D., University of Kansas, 2011.

Neil Rowe, Professor (1983); Ph.D., Stanford University, 1983.

Amela Sadagic, Research Associate Professor and Co-director of NPS Center for Additive Manufacturing (2004); Ph.D., University College London, 1999.

Mike Senft (LTC), Military Lecturer (2019); MEM, Washington State University, 2007.

Alan Shaffer, Senior Lecturer (2008); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 2008.

Gurminder Singh, Chairman, Department of Computer Sciences, Director, Center for the Study of Mobile Devices and Communications, and Professor (2002); Ph.D., University of Alberta, 1989.

Kirk Stork, Research Associate (2008); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1996.

Michael Thompson, Research Associate (2012); B.S., Marquette University, 1981.

Dennis Volpano, Associate Professor (1991); Ph.D., Oregon Graduate Institute, 1986.

Geoffrey Xie, Professor (1996); Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 1996.

Warren Yu, Research Associate (2009); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1998.

Emeritus Professors

Mikhail Auguston, Associate Professor Emeritus (2003); Ph.D., Glushkov Cybernetics Institute, 1983.

Robert B. McGhee, Professor Emeritus (1986); Ph.D., University of Southern California, 1963.

Degrees

The Department of Computer Science provides graduate training and education in major areas of computer science; thus, both basic and advanced graduate courses are offered. Course work and research lead to either the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree. The requirements to complete either program are rigorous and are comparable to those of other major universities.

Master of Science in Computer Science

Master of Computing Technology

Master of Science in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation

Master of Science in Software Engineering (inactive)

Master of Arts in Identity Management and Cyber Security

Doctor of Philosophy in Computer Science

Doctor of Philosophy in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation

Doctor of Philosophy in Software Engineering (inactive)

Laboratories

There are currently 11 laboratories:

Introductory Computer Security Laboratory

This lab is primarily used by the Center for Information Security Studies and Research (CISR). The lab consists of a virtual infrastructure of clients and servers serving the needs of multiple CS department classes such as:

The studies of information assurance, computer security, high assurance system architecture and authentication where it is used to introduce students to studies in high assurance systems, public key infrastructure, mandatory access control, viruses, covert channels and the reference monitor concept.

The security manager's view of diverse management concerns associated with administering and operating an automated information system facility with minimized risk. Also used in certifying that students have met the requirements for educational standards published by the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS).

The fundamentals of computer forensics in the context of DoN/DoD information operations. Students examine how information is stored and how it may be deliberately hidden and/or subverted.

The basis for understanding the potential vulnerabilities in networked systems by applying a problem-solving approach to obtain information about a remote network and exploit or subvert those systems using various techniques and tools along with discussing vulnerability discovery and mitigation.

Students taking the course this lab primarily serves are from multiple departments across campus. For more information, please contact Professors Cote or Clark.

Computer Information Security Research (CISR) Laboratory

This lab is primarily used by the Center for Information Security Studies and Research (CISR). The lab consists of a virtual infrastructure of clients and servers to allow the student to study network vulnerabilities, intrusion detection, secure system management and computer forensics; where tools used by administrators and hackers can be freely researched and studied. Students are given full administrator privileges on virtual machines so that multiple operating systems and tools can provide a basis for understanding the potential vulnerabilities and their mitigation in networked systems by studying methods to: (1) obtain information about a remote network, (2) to possibly exploit or subvert systems residing on that network and (3) techniques to mitigate risks to networked systems. For more information, please contact Professors Cote or Clark.

Network Research and Experimentation Laboratories

Introductory PC Network Laboratory

Intermediate Local Area Network Laboratory

These two labs support the Networks Specialty and provide students the opportunity to apply network theory in concrete applications. The Introductory PC Network Laboratory enables students to install network hardware and software, learning firsthand the advantages, limitations, and intricacies of various components and operating systems. The Intermediate Local Area Network Laboratory allows students to participate in ongoing Next Generation INTERNET research, advanced protocol development, future high-speed digital switching systems experimentation, network management, and control design and analysis. These labs also directly support DoD-funded research for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Wireless and Mobile Computing Laboratory

The Wireless and Mobile Computing Lab provides the majority of academic computing needs to support the wireless and mobile computing specialty within the Department of Computer Science. This lab provides students with the opportunity to program and examine security aspects of mobile computing devices ranging from personal digital assistants (PDAs) through cellular phones.

Autonomous Robotics Coordination Laboratory

This teaching and research computer lab supports graduate students and faculty work on sponsored classes/research projects regarding the coordination between multiple autonomous robots to achieve a coordinated result. The lab is equipped with several types of programmable robots and a wide range of intelligent software tools, including programming languages, planners, language processors, image processors, and neural-computing.

Software Engineering Laboratory

This laboratory provides a state-of-the-art engineering systems environment to support graduate students and faculty work on sponsored classes and projects in software automation. The laboratory provides a test bed for DoD software-intensive systems and software for embedded safety-critical systems can be precisely tested in the lab. Evaluation and assessment on network-based system integration and interoperability, and the risk assessment on systems of systems can be conducted effectively in the lab. The lab also provides support for requirements analysis, prototyping, specification, and computer-aided system architecture design.

Forensics Exploitation Lab

This laboratory provides a state-of-the-art forensics exploitation environment to support graduate students and faculty work on sponsored classes and projects in basic and applied forensics exploitation research projects. Primary work is done with new techniques for automatically processing data recovered from disk drives and other types of storage devices. Using forensic techniques, the data on a hard drive can reveal who used or broke into a computer system, what it was used for or what was done during a break-in, and the identities of those in question.

SCIF Security Lab

This laboratory provides a state-of-the-art engineering systems environment to support graduate students and faculty work on sponsored classes and projects in security areas that are required to be conducted in high-security, compartmented classifications and dedicated air-gapped hardware/networks.

Virtual Environments Lab

The Virtual Environments Lab provides the equipment necessary to experience and study virtual and augmented environments. Head-worn displays and associated tracking hardware display the visual content of artificially created environments. The immersive nature of these environments cannot be studied on other hardware such as computer monitors. Virtual and augmented environments are integral to the MOVES Institute's mission goals. They are of instrumental importance to many DoD training applications as well as military operations. Cross disciplinary classes and even student research projects can be performed with this equipment as well, for departments including Computer Science, Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, and Operations Research.

LVC Simulation Interoperability Lab

The MOVES Live Virtual Constructive (LVC) Simulation Interoperability Lab offers students and researchers the tools and network infrastructure needed to experiment with the connectivity of various simulations and command and control (C2) systems that support tactical training, system test & evaluation, and wargaming.  The lab consists of twelve virtual and constructive simulations and three software interoperability architectures.  In addition, the lab is connected to virtual private network (VPN) allowing faculty to interact with students while not physically in the lab.  This VPN also enables MOVES to collaborate with other NPS Departments, National Labs and Universities on emerging simulation interoperability topics.

Computer Science Course Descriptions

CS Courses

MV Courses

SW Courses