Department of Systems Engineering

Chair

Ronald Giachetti, Ph.D.

Code SE/Gi, Bullard Hall, Room 201K

(831) 656-2670, DSN 756-3001, FAX (831) 656-3129

regiache@nps.edu

Associate Chair for Research

Robert C. Harney, Ph.D.

Code SE/Ha, Bullard Hall, Room 201A

(831) 656-2685, DSN 756-2685

harney@nps.edu

Associate Chair for Instruction

Eugene P. Paulo, Ph.D.

Code SE/Pa, Bullard Hall, Room 220

(831) 656-3452, DSN 756-3452

eppaulo@nps.edu

Associate Chair for Operations

Matthew G. Boensel

Code SE/Bn, Bullard Hall, Room 217A

(831) 656-3489, DSN 756-3489

mgboense@nps.edu

Associate Chair for Distance Learning Programs and Outreach

Walter E. Owen, DPA

Code SE/WO, St Louis, MO

(831) 402-6086

wowen@nps.edu

Timothy Anderson, Lecturer (2007); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1994.

Paul T. Beery, Assistant Professor (2009); Ph.D, Naval Postgraduate School, 2016.

Barbara Berlitz, Senior Lecturer (2011); J.D., Monterey College of Law, 1985.

Matthew G. Boensel, Senior Lecturer (1999); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1988.

Katherine M. Cain, Education Associate (2002); M.S., University of Massachusetts Amherst, 1989.

Charles N. Calvano, Professor Emeritus (1991); Engineering Degree, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1970.

Ronald R. Carlson, Professor of Practice and Program Officer (2009).

John Dillard, Senior Lecturer (2004); MA, East Carolina University, 1973.

Rama Gehris, Professor of Practice (2011); DSc, George Washington University, 2008.

Ronald Giachetti, Professor and Chair (2011); Ph.D., North Carolina State University, 1996.

Kristin Giammarco, Associate Professor and Academic Associate (2009); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 2012.

Kathleen Giles, Assistant Professor (2018); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 2018.

John “Mike” Green, Senior Lecturer (2002); M.S., MBA, University of New Haven, 1986 and 1998.

Robert C. Harney, Associate Professor, Associate Chair for Research (1995); Ph.D., University of California at Davis, 1976.

Lois K. Hazard, Faculty Associate – Research (2013); B.A., Holy Names University, 1978.

Alejandro Hernandez, Associate Professor (2011); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 2008.

Bonnie W. Johnson, Lecturer (2011); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 2012.

Marianna J. Jones, Faculty Associate-Research (2013); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2006.

Rabia Khan, Faculty Associate-Research (2012); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2014.

Joseph T. Klamo, Assistant Professor (2015); Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 2007.

Brigitte E. Kwinn, Lecturer and Program Officer (2008); M.S., University of Arizona, 1994.

Raymond J. Madachy, Professor and Academic Associate (2008); Ph.D., University of Southern California, 1994.

Gregory Miller, Senior Lecturer (2004); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School (1992).

Donald Muehlbach, Professor of Practice (2009); Ph.D., Capella University, 2008.

Bryan M. O’Halloran, Assistant Professor (2016); Ph.D., Oregon State University, 2013.

Walter Owen, Senior Associate Chair, Academic Associate and Program Officer (1992); DPA, Golden Gate University, 2002.

Fotis A. Papoulias, Associate Professor (1988); Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1987.

Gary Parker, Faculty Associate-Research (2010); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1986.

Eugene P. Paulo, Associate Professor (2000); Ph.D., University of Central Florida, 1998.

Charles Pickar*, USA (Ret.), Senior Lecturer (2009), Ph.D., NOVA Southeastern University, 2003.

Anthony Pollman, Assistant Professor (2017), Ph.D., University of Maryland, 2011.

Wayne Porter*, USN (Ret.), Senior Lecturer (2015); Ph.D. Naval Postgraduate School, 2014.

Mark M. Rhoades, Senior Lecturer (1999); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1990, 2006.

Robert Semmens, Assistant Professor (2018); Ph.D., Stanford University, 2017.

Lawrence G. Shattuck*, Senior Lecturer (2005); Ph.D., The Ohio State University, 1995.

Mark R. Stevens, Senior Lecturer and Academic Associate (2003); M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1988.

Joseph Sweeney III, Lecturer and Program Officer (2010); M.S., Southern Methodist University, 2018.

Douglas Van Bossuyt, Assistant Professor (2018); Ph.D., Oregon State University, 2012.

Warren Vaneman, Professor of Practice (2012); Ph.D., Virginia Tech, 2002.

Clifford Whitcomb, Distinguished Professor (2005); Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1998.

Christopher Wolfgeher, Faculty Associate-Research (2011); M.Eng., Colorado State University, 2011.

Oleg Yakimenko, Distinguished Professor (1989); Ph.D., Russian Academy of Sciences, 1991.

The year of joining the Naval Postgraduate School faculty is indicated in parentheses.

(* indicates faculty member has a joint appointment to another department at NPS)

Mission

The mission of the Department of Systems Engineering is to provide relevant, tailored, and unique advanced education and research programs in Systems Engineering in order to increase the combat effectiveness of US and allied armed forces and to enhance the security of the United States.

Brief Overview

The Department of Systems Engineering provides rigorous academic programs on the design, development, and operation of large, complex weapon systems. The programs cover the technical activities for the entire system life-cycle.

Students in the Systems Engineering Department are admitted to one of several available curricula. Curriculum details are provided in the catalog with each one identified by a unique curriculum number.  Each curriculum is defined using educational skill requirements and related academic coursework. For active duty US naval officer students, the successful completion of a curriculum leads to the award of a sub-specialty code, or p-code, and award of a degree in one of the masters programs offered for the curriculum. For other active duty US military, foreign military, and civilian students, successful completion of a curriculum leads to the award of a degree in one of the masters programs offered for the curriculum.

The Systems Engineering Department offers six degree programs:

  1.  Master of Science in Systems Engineering (MSSE) Program – requires an ABET EAC undergraduate engineering degree, or equivalent. Four curricula options (308, 311, 312, 580) allow a student to earn a MSSE degree.

  2. Master of Science in Engineering Systems (MSES) Program – does not require an undergraduate engineering degree. Three curricula options (311, 312, 580) allow a student to earn a MSES degree.

  3. Master of Science in Systems Engineering Analysis (MSSEA) Program – does not require an undergraduate engineering degree. One curriculum option (308) allows a student to earn a MSSEA degree.

  4. Master of Science in Product Development (MSPD) Program – does not require an undergraduate engineering degree. One curriculum option (721) allows a student to earn a MSPD degree.

  5. Master of Science in Systems Engineering Management (MSSEM) Program – does not require an undergraduate engineering degree. Four curricula options (522, 711, 721, 722) allow a student to earn a MSSEM degree.

  6. Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Program in Systems Engineering. Two curricula options (581, 582) allow a student to earn a Ph.D. degree.

Any student study plan leading to award of a degree offered by the SE department must be approved by the Chairman of the Department of Systems Engineering at least two quarters before completion. In general, approved curricula may require more than minimum degree requirements in order to conform to the needs and objectives of the service or agency sponsoring the student.

A specific curriculum must be consistent with the general minimum requirements for the degree program as determined by the Academic Council.  

SE Degree Programs

Master of Science in Systems Engineering Program

The Systems Engineering Department offers the MSSE Program through the 308, 311, 312, and 580 curricula options. The specific course of study leading to the MSSE differs for each curriculum. Refer to the 308, 311, 312, and 580 curricula for details.

The MSSE program is ABET EAC accredited. The other Systems Engineering Department programs, MSES, MSSEA, MSPD, MSSEM, and Ph.D. are not ABET EAC accredited.

Program Educational Objectives

The overall educational objective of the Systems Engineering Department is to support the NPS mission by producing graduates who have, at an advanced level, knowledge and technical competence in systems engineering and an application domain; and who can use that knowledge and competence to support national security.  Specific program educational objectives (i.e., skills and abilities that graduates can bring to their position after having graduated from NPS and having received 3-5 more years of on-the-job training and professional development) are:

  Technical Leadership: Graduates will be known and respected for applying their engineering knowledge in leadership roles along diverse career paths in government service.

  Program Management: Graduates will be known and respected for their research, design, development, procurement, integration, maintenance, and life-cycle management of systems for defense and national security.

  Operational Utilization: Graduates will be known and respected for their application of systems engineering in diverse military settings and understand its capabilities and limitations.

Student Outcomes

In order to achieve the program educational objectives for the master of science in systems engineering (MSSE) program, graduates must complete at least one year of study, or at least 45 quarter credit hours, beyond a baccalaureate level program, achieve a mastery of systems engineering, and complete a thesis or capstone project report, where each student attains outcomes demonstrating an ability to:

1.  Subject Matter Competence:  Apply advanced graduate-level knowledge and competencies in the systems engineering discipline.

2.  Technical Merit: Apply technical expertise and methodological rigor in conducting research and analysis.

3.  Engineering Reasoning: Apply critical thinking and reasoning.

4.  Communication: Communicate results both orally and in writing.

In addition to attaining these student outcomes, each student will have had post-secondary educational and/or professional experiences that supports that attainment of student outcomes as defined in the ABET EAC general criteria for baccalaureate programs, Criterion 3; and includes at least one year of math and basic science, at least one-and-a-half years of engineering topics, and a major design experience that meets the requirements in the general criteria for baccalaureate programs, Criterion 5.  Students that have attained an ABET EAC accredited undergraduate degree meet these post-secondary requirements.

Requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Systems Engineering:

An ABET EAC accredited Bachelor of Science degree in an engineering discipline or established equivalency.

  1. Completion of an approved curriculum that includes:
    1. A minimum of 36 quarter credit hours of 3000 and 4000 level courses, 16 of which must be at the 4000 level.
    2. A series of courses in systems engineering defined by each curriculum.
  2. Completion of a 12 quarter credit hour hour thesis course sequence and a thesis or a capstone project course sequence and capstone project report, depending on curriculum requirements.

 Master of Science in Engineering Systems Program

A candidate shall have earned the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree. Degree requirements:

1. Completion of an approved curriculum that includes:

a.  A minimum of 36 quarter credit hours of 3000 and 4000 level courses, 16 of which must be at the 4000 level.

b.  A series of courses in systems engineering defined by each curriculum.

2. Completion of a 12 quarter credit hour hour thesis course sequence and a thesis or a capstone project course sequence and capstone project report, depending on curriculum requirements.


Master of Science in Product Development Program

A candidate shall have earned the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree. Degree requirements:

  1. The Master of Science degree in Product Development requires a minimum of 48 quarter-hours of graduate level work.
  2. The candidate must take all courses in an approved curriculum, which must satisfy the following requirements:
    1. There must be a minimum of 36 quarter-hours of credits in 3000 and 4000 level courses, including a minimum of 16 quarter-hours at the 4000 level.
    2. The course work must include four courses in systems engineering methods, defined by each curriculum.
  3. Additional courses must be selected from an approved list.
  4. The candidate must complete an approved thesis.

Master of Science in Systems Engineering Management Program

A candidate shall have earned the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree. Degree requirements:

  1. The Master of Science degree in Systems Engineering Management requires a minimum of 48 quarter-hours of graduate level work.
  2. The candidate must take all courses in an approved curriculum, which must satisfy the following requirements:
    1. There must be a minimum of 36 quarter-hours of credits in 3000 and 4000 level courses, including a minimum of 16 quarter-hours at the 4000 level.
    2. The course work must include four courses in systems engineering methods, defined by each curriculum.
  3. Additional courses must be selected from an approved list, defined by each curriculum.
  4. The candidate must complete an approved thesis.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree Programs

The Department of Systems Engineering offers a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in Systems Engineering. Students take graduate level course in systems engineering (as needed to pass the oral and written qualifying examinations), advanced graduate courses in systems engineering and an application domain, and perform research that leads to a dissertation involving some aspect of systems engineering. Research topics may be selected from a broad variety of studies of the systems engineering process, applications of systems engineering to solving complex problems, systems level modeling and simulation, and systems suitability assessment. Subject to approval of the student's dissertation committee chairman, dissertation research may be conducted away from NPS at cooperating facilities. Students must satisfy a one-year residency requirement. This may be met by completing an NPS M.S. degree plus periodic extended stays (nominally two weeks per quarter) at an NPS campus spread throughout the duration of the student's program. The M.S. degree may be completed before enrollment in the Ph.D. program.

Applicants should possess an M.S. degree in Systems Engineering. Applicants with only a B.S. degree or an M.S. degree in another discipline will be required to take a number of systems engineering courses (equivalent to the coursework portion of an MSSE degree program) to pass the qualifying examinations.

Laboratories and Research

Students in the Systems Engineering Department participate in a variety of research activities ranging from course-based experiments and individual classroom projects to larger team-based design projects and individual thesis research. Systems Engineering Department faculty members conduct a variety of research in four broad areas.

Systems Engineering Methodology involves the investigation or development of tools and techniques for conceptualizing, designing, and developing systems. Study areas include discovery of fundamental principles of systems theory, elucidating the use of these principles through systems engineering tools and techniques, analyzing the conditions of employing the tools and techniques, and determining the efficacy of those tools and techniques. Specific methodology areas include system requirements generation, requirements allocation, system architecture, system dynamics and control, and risk engineering.

Systems Engineering Applications involves the application of systems engineering processes to the solution of specific complex problems. This can include conceptual design of systems, investigation of issues associated with integration of system components into system segments, investigation of issues associated with integration of system segments into systems, and the analysis of case studies of successful and/or unsuccessful systems engineering applied to military acquisition programs. Specific application areas include combat systems integration, ship systems engineering, and enterprise systems engineering.

System Simulation and Modeling involves the development of simulations and models of military systems, evaluation of the efficacy of these simulations and models in providing the information to accomplish systems engineering functions (especially system design requirements and comparison of alternative solutions), and investigation of the characteristics of simulations and models that lead to outputs useful in the systems engineering process.

System Suitability Assessment involves the study of tools, techniques, and disciplines that permit the assessment of the suitability of systems in meeting requirements. Requirements can include performance, availability, operability, and cost. Specific suitability assessment areas include reliability engineering, system survivability, and system cost estimation and control.

The Systems Engineering Department maintains a number of laboratories to its support instructional and research objectives. These laboratories serve to:

  • Provide broad, hands-on, practical engineering experiences to systems engineering students enhancing application domain understanding at the component level and subsystem levels and balancing analysis with exploratory development and prototyping.
  • Provide an environment (facilities and equipment) that fosters student projects with resulting hardware prototypes and investigations that reach beyond concept definition to later stages of the life cycle.
  • Provide an environment that facilitates student and faculty experimental research in applications of systems engineering.

Administratively the research facilities of the Systems Engineering Department are organized into five laboratories. Each of these laboratories contains one or more instructional research spaces.

The SE Demonstrations Lab provides space & equipment for developing and housing a wide variety of demonstrations that enhance courses in the systems engineering curricula.

The SE Computation Lab provides computational support for large-scale simulation, modeling, and systems engineering projects. It houses Lockheed Martin systems engineering software, a variety of complex simulation & modeling software (such as the Navy Simulation System), and the 75 interconnected computers needed to run that software. The lab also provides a general-purpose computing facility that supports all systems engineering classes, thesis projects, and capstone projects. It may be utilized by distance learning students as well as resident students.

The SE Projects Lab provides an environment in which students can work together to pursue team-based systems engineering projects or pursue independent study related to courses or thesis research. In addition, facilities, tools, and materials are provided to permit fabrication, assembly, integration, and test of electronic and mechanical equipment in support of projects and theses.

The SE Foundations Lab provides direct exposure to the scientific concepts and techniques that underlie modern engineering disciplines. It provides facilities and equipment to perform basic experiments in physics, chemistry, biology, electronics, and materials science. This laboratory also provides basic equipment that facilitates hardware-oriented thesis research programs and student capstone projects. Administered within the SE Foundations Lab are the Physical Systems Lab, the Defense Applications Lab, the Nuclear Detector Lab, the Electro-Optical Sensor Systems Lab, and the Virtual Lab.

The Physical Systems Lab supports experiments that elucidate the fundamental properties, characteristics, and interactions of mechanical, thermodynamic, and electromagnetic systems. The Defense Applications Lab supports experiments involving wet chemistry, microorganisms, and/or biological materials. It provides facilities and equipment for simple chemical synthesis, chemical analysis, electrochemistry, microbial culture, microscopy, DNA analysis, and other biotechnologies. The Nuclear Detector Lab supports experiments involving detection of nuclear radiation. It hosts a variety of low-level radioactive sources, detector systems, signal processing electronics, and shielding against background radiation. The Electro-Optical Sensor Systems Lab supports experiments involving electro-optical sensors (television, image intensifiers, thermal imaging, etc.) that require complete darkness for some measurements. The Virtual Lab supports portable laboratory concepts, especially software-based virtual experiments and software that is not available for network use in the SE Computation Lab. It also supports distance learning activities by providing a foundation for future insertion of laboratory experiences into the DL systems engineering courses.

The SE Applications Lab augments lecture courses in the engineering applications tracks (including combat systems, ship systems, and enterprise systems, among others) in the SE curriculum. It provides hands-on experience with important concepts and permits direct observation of critical phenomena associated with combat systems and sensor/weapon networks. It also provides equipment that can be used in student thesis projects and capstone design projects. Experiments cover the gamut from signal propagation to sensor fundamentals to specific sensor technologies to weapons operational concepts to sensor & weapon networks to technologies associated with the integration of sensors, weapons, and control technologies into modern military platforms of all types. Administered within the SE Applications Lab are the Ship Systems/Combat Systems Lab, the Enterprise Systems Lab, and the Laser/Lidar Development Lab.

The Ship Systems/Combat Systems Lab supports experiments in the Ship Systems and Combat Systems track courses. It hosts a variety of active & passive microwave, infrared, acoustic, & magnetic sensor hardware, weapon subsystems & simulators of weapon systems, and devices permitting the investigation of platform characteristics. The Enterprise Systems Lab supports experiments in the Enterprise Systems Engineering track courses. It provides network hardware, communication systems, and electronic measurement and analysis equipment, as well as multiple sensor types to provide input and network-controllable systems to utilize output. The Laser/Lidar Development Lab provides optical tables, breadboard optical hardware, laser measurement equipment, and a variety of laser sources in a laser safety-qualified laboratory.

Systems Engineering Course Descriptions

SE Courses

SI Courses